Sunday, June 4, 2017

Radicalized Artists - The Human Condition Laid Bare


Be true to your art!  Nothing else matters! 

- David Goodis, 1950s

Like Goodis, Mary Perry Stone did not turn a blind eye to those who many failed to see. Rather they dedicated their unlimited talents to telling a story of people with no voice, no power and no hope.  Their work is a pertinent and timely today as when they created their masterful works.  

Watch these short movies about Mary Perry Stone and feel the visceral strain that we should all feel.

AN ARTIST HAS TO FIND AN HONEST EXPRESSION.  I DON'T SEPARATE THE AESTHETIC FROM THE MESSAGE.  I'M PAINTING FOR BOTH THINGS, THE MESSAGE IS IN THE AESTHETICS."

- MARY PERRY STONE, 2000




This video is about Mary Perry Stone, a humanist artist living in San Francisco during the 1950's, contrasting her art with abstract art, the most promoted art during the Cold War.


Why show a protest artist’s 1990s radical murals? Are they still relevant today? Mary Perry Stone, a former WPA sculptor, didn’t drink, smoke or lead a wild life. Her passion was being a social protest artist; it remained so throughout her life. When she was in her eighties and early nineties, Mary painted many murals depicting what she deemed the horrors of Capitalism. Her art was her own, expressive and powerful.

1 comment:

  1. Lou, thanks for posting . Mary's 1960s protest art is shown in the film, " I Paint, I Protest: Mary Perry Stone." The film about the Cold War's impact on art in the 1950s is called ," Mary, Art, and the Cold War."
    While "A Life in Art" was made by students, "Hidden Murals", and "I Paint, I Protest", had professional assistance.

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