Thursday, August 9, 2018

Lone Eagles, Battle Birds, and FLYING ACES

For pre-pub discount on Ebook see
https://downandoutbooks.com/bookstore/gertzman-david-goodis/
Here is Pilot Goodis, noble loser, bailing out, East of Chunking, amid Zeros--in a bad dream.
There was no pulp genre more dedicated to making readers proud of their country than the air war yarns in which Goodis excelled. He was a sort of king of the genre (rather as H Ron Hubbard was king of sci-fi yarns): Army-Navy Flying StoriesFighting AcesRAF AcesFlying AcesWingsBattle BirdsDare Devil AcesCaptain CombatThe Lone Eagle. Collector and author Walker Martin estimates that he may have written 100 of these. Since he developed a reputation among publishers of the genre, when one or more stories under the house names Byron P Short, Roy C Raney, David Crewe, Logan C. Claybourne, Roy Shotwell, and/or Lance Kermit
 

“Kid Brother”, RAF Aces (Canadian), Dec 1944
The “kid” is a conscientious objector. He is thought, of course, to be a coward. After an altercation with a soldier at an airfield, which leads to the latter being killed in the Nazi raid, the kid  is told that if he is sorry, he should go fight for his country.  So he does, out of remorse at his part in the soldier’s death.  “A mad mixture of anguish and horror and self-hatred made a torturing flame within him.” Goodis builds up suspense as Allan refuses to shoot but escapes the Nazi planes through skill. But when he sees his brother in trouble, he does. “It’s taken a rather rough sky party [Brit dry wit] to prove to me you can’t fight Nazi bullets with peace pamphlets.” 
        While Goodis' conscientious objector story line is daring in an air war yarn, it pales in comparison with Steve Fisher’s “For My Country” (Fighting Aces, November 1940), set during World War I. Flier Marvin Miller must watch while his brother is executed for cowardice. He refused to engage a German pilot and flew away. The reason was, the condemned man confides to his brother, that a third brother, John, was flying the German bi-plane. He had been in Germany in 1914 and was impressed into the air force. Later, Marv sights his brother, and  begs off, explaining that his guns jammed. But the next day, as John waves at him from his cockpit, Marvin dispatches his brother’s plane.
tt
“ The Cloud Wizard,” Sky Raiders, February 1943: Bersbee was a leader of his RAF squadron, with 27 kills. He gave the other flyers confidence they had to have. A reclusive soul who never executed playboy-type spins and sharp dives, he was a detached, severe individual, but as he had saved many fellow flyers with Messerschmidts on their tails, his aloofness simply made him more God-like. One flyer, Meader, wants to speak with him. The result is a fist fight with a member of the squadron that does not want Bersbee annoyed. Later, Meader learns of the pressure Bersbee was under as he tried to figure out the math formulae that would make him and the group successful. Bersbee breaks down weeping when Meader forces the explanation out of him—a binge of desk-pounding, paper-crumpling howls “like a child who purposely tries to cry so hard he cannot catch his breath.” Meader, appalled, blames his own lone wolf stubbornness at finding out the proper explanation for whatever comes into his line of vision. Perhaps he too was a little too tough. The next day Bersbee dies in his Spitfire, refusing, as Meader knew he would, to bail out. And Meader takes Bersbee’s place as the anxious lone wolf, existing with the slide rule and mathematical calculations that he uses to perfect the flying skills that save many men, as he dives from the clouds to surprise the Nazis. He is the new larger-than-life super hero with the same secret life that eventually martyred his predecessor. 
 
The highest flyers suffer and sacrifice the most, in many kinds of pulp.
Copyright © 2018 Jay Gertzman, All rights reserved. 

No comments:

Post a Comment